Endurance

$ 12,00

Experience one of the greatest adventure stories of the modern age in this New York Times bestseller: the harrowing tale of British explorer Ernest Shackleton’s 1914 attempt to reach the South Pole.

In August 1914, polar explorer Ernest Shackleton boarded the Endurance and set sail for Antarctica, where he planned to cross the last uncharted continent on foot. In January 1915, after battling its way through a thousand miles of pack ice and only a day’s sail short of its destination, the Endurance became locked in an island of ice. Thus began the legendary ordeal of Shackleton and his crew of twenty-seven men. When their ship was finally crushed between two ice floes, they attempted a near-impossible journey over 850 miles of the South Atlantic’s heaviest seas to the closest outpost of civilization.

In Endurance, the definitive account of Ernest Shackleton’s fateful trip, Alfred Lansing brilliantly narrates the harrowing and miraculous voyage that has defined heroism for the modern age.

Product details

  • Publisher

    :

    Basic Books (April 1, 2015)
  • Language

    :

    English
  • Paperback

    :

    357 pages
  • ISBN-10

    :

    0465062881
  • ISBN-13

    :

    978-0465062881
  • Item Weight

    :

    15.2 ounces
  • Dimensions

    :

    5.5 x 1.04 x 8.25 inches

SKU: 0465062881
Category:
Publisher ‏ : ‎

Basic Books (April 1, 2015)

Language ‏ : ‎

English

Paperback ‏ : ‎

357 pages

ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎

0465062881

ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎

978-0465062881

Item Weight ‏ : ‎

15.2 ounces

Dimensions ‏ : ‎

5.5 x 1.04 x 8.25 inches

Best Sellers Rank:

#1 in Expeditions & Discoveries World History (Books)

Customer Reviews:

10,187 ratings

Customer Reviews

1-5 of 10 reviews

  • Tom Brody

    ENDURANCE SHACKLETON’S INCREDIBLE VOYAGE by Alfred Lansing is a 280-page book about a voyage to Antarctica, where the goal was to cross the continent on foot, and where this goal was prevented when the ship, the Endurance, became permanently trapped in ice. The ship became trapped at a point about 30 miles from the LUITPOLD COAST, followed by dragging of the trapped ship by the ice to a point 800 miles away from the Luitpold Coast, and at this more distant point, the trapped ship finally sank. After the ship sank, the men continued on foot, but most of their travel was provided by the movement of their ice floe. The movement of the ice floe brought them a further 500 miles, and to within 100 miles of their final destination (Elephant Island). When the ice floe broke up, the men set out in three small boats, and traveled this final 100 miles. Aside from the name of the ship, the word “endurance” occurs in only one context, namely that of “bladder endurance.” Bladder endurance was a problem when the men were camping in the stone shelters on Elephant Island, and needed to use a common 2-gallon gasoline can as a urinal at night (page 204).The book begins on August 1, 1914, when the Endurance set sail from London. The story ends on August 30, 1916, when Shackleton managed to land his rescue ship on Elephant Island, Antarctica, to retrieve the men who were left behind. The expedition was called, IMPERIAL TRANS-ANTARCTIC EXPEDITION, and all 28 men are listed on page 1 of the book. The book has two maps, the first tracking the location where Endurance was trapped (Jan. 19, 1915) in ice, the location where Endurance was crushed and therefore abandoned (Oct. 27, 1915), the location of the men’s journey on the moving ice floe, and the final 100 mile stretch where the men took three small boats to Elephant Island to land on April 9, 1916. The second map shows the entire journey of Endurance from South Georgia Island to just off the coast of Antarctica, and the journey of one of the three small boats (the Caird) from Elephant Island back to South Georgia Island, where Shackleton successfully rounded up a rescue party.There are six black and white photos, taken by crew member Frank Hurley. The photos show the Endurance locked in ice, the Endurance after being crushed, Frank Hurley posing with Ernest Shackleton by their tent on an ice floe (taken on May 10, 1916), and a photo of the rescue vessel arriving on August 30, 1916. There are also reproductions of two paintings by the ship’s artist.THE WRITING. Aside from a handful of literary excesses in the first several pages, this book is absolutely devoid of journalistic fluff. There is no attempt at re-creating conversations. There is no attempt at drama or pathos. There is no attempt to impress the reader with difficult words or with long sentences. I love Mr. Lansing’s writing style. Mr. Lansing prefers to remain invisible, and his writing comes so naturally, and the result is that I felt like I was one of the crew members when I read the book.CLIFF HANGERS. The narrative provides a dozen or so cliff hangers, where the reader is aware that the men are faced with the threat of immediate death. These threats include savage storms at sea, having an ice floe disintegrate under the men’s camping area, threats of having the three small boats crushed between ice floes, and threats of freezing to death. In the final chapter, when Mr. Shackleton set foot on South Georgia Island, and attempted to cross the Island on foot, he repeatedly took pathways that led to a dead-end that terminated at the top of a high cliff, producing the threat of death due to lack of food and exposure to the cold.OPTIMISM AND COURAGE. In a broader sense, the book is an illustration of courage in the face of constant life-threatening cold, and in the face of the threat of being lost at sea. The book provides little explicit guidance on the meaning of leadership, but it is easy to read between the lines. We learn that Mr. Shackleton never expressed thoughts of hopelessness, the fact that none of the men were drama queens (see, page 40), the fact that the men possessed a good sense of humor (see page 42), were incapable of malice (page 78), and were willing to join in singing (pages 17, 45, 75). What also helped keep the men in good spirits was that one man had a banjo, and that there was ususually plenty of powdered milk, canned beets and cauliflowers, and biscuits on hand. My own personnal opinion is as follows. Although it is difficult to eliminate drama queens during the job interview process, it is very easy to keep employees in good spirits by providing free food at regular intervals.EXCERPTS. We learn that the trip was funded by James Caird ($120,000), the UK government ($50,000), and the Royal Geographic Society ($5,000). We learn that second in command was Frank Wild, who had accompanied Shackleton on earlier trips to Antarctica. We learn that Endurance set sail from London the week that World War I started. The Endurance had three sails and a coal-fired 350 hp steam engine, that she was designed by Aanderud Larsen, and was built in Norway. Frank Hurley, the photographer, had already been to Antarctica with another explorer (Douglas Mawson). Sixtynine dogs were also brought along, though they never had a chance to pull the sledges over Antarctica.DISTASTER #1. On page 30, Endurance gets permanently trapped in ice. Although this entrapment occurred only 60 miles away from land, the ship was trapped in an ice floe that has a surface that was too “hummocky” to risk travel (page 34).DISASTER #2. By page 36, a quarter of the dogs had died, and the cause was foot long red worms.DISASTER #3. We learn that the ship’s order of phonograph needles was discovered, instead, to consist of a box of 5,000 sewing needles (page 43). This is not really a disaster, but it is amusing to recount this.DISASTER #4. On page 59, the ship, which had been trapped for nine months, was finally crushed, and the men rescued their mittens, tobacco, surgical instruments, banjo, photographic negatives, cases of sugar, flour, rice, barley, and jam, stoves, and toothbrushes (page 80).DISASTER #5. Sometimes walk through the deep slush on the ice floe was very slow, for example, after one five hour walk the party had advanced only a half mile (page 93). At one point, a sea leopard attacked Thomas Orde-Lees, and he was rescued by Frank Wild, who shot the sea leopard, which weighed 1,100 pounds (page 102).DISASTER #6. The banjo-playing proved to be torture, because Leonard Hussey (meteorologist) knew only six tunes (page 104). It is amusing to recount this, even though it is not really a disaster.DISASTER #7. The men complained that their meat-based diet (seals, sea leopards, penguins, dog pemmican) was causing flatulence and a “squeaky gut.” Ice was used for toilet paper, and ice freezing on the skin caused chronically unhealed sores (page 112).DISASTER #8. The continued drift of the ice floe brought the men too far north to be able to debark at Paulet Island, leaving open the possibility of debarking at islands further to the north, such as Elephant Island or drifting even further north to be lost at sea in the dreaded DRAKE PASSAGE (pages 117-121, 124, 134).DISASTER #9. Food shortages with concomitant sub-zero temperatures was an occasional threat (page 122). The continued failure of the ice pack to disintegrate prevented the men from sailing to land, which at one point, was only 42 miles away (page 123). The ice was too lumpy to cross, and the floes were too close to each other for a safe sailing.DISASTER #10. Eventually, the ice floes used by the men for camping started to break apart (pages 128, 132, 137) and on page 138, the three small boats were launched. Killer whales surfaced on all sides of the boats (page 141), and masses of churning ice caused by rip tides threatened to overturn the boats (page 141). It is interesting to point out that the small boats were caulked with seal blood, or with cotton lamp wick and oil paints (pages 85, 107).CONCLUSION. This book is an excellent model to other historians, as a guide on how to write history books. Love this book! The last time I read a book like this was in elementary school, when I read THE RAFT by ROBERT TRUMBULL. The Raft is another non-fiction book about survival at sea. I read The Raft during the time of the Seattle World’s Fair (ha, ha, not really recently).

    December 25, 2022
  • Kindle Customer

    Shackleton was an incredible leader and without him this voyage would have not been possible. Ever though the reader will already know how the story ends, the author leads the reader through a narrative that makes him or her anxious about the outcome and caring about the crew. Be ready to feel cold, hungry and stiff as you read it. It is that well written!

    December 25, 2022
  • Michael Wise

    This account of sheer will, determination and leadership is second to none. To have lived so long in awful conditions is a story for explorers to aspire to. No to put themselves in such precarious situations, rather to keep the discipline and to never give in.

    December 25, 2022
  • Olivia S.

    The story was very interesting and I enjoyed reading it. For people with sensory issues I will warn you that the cover on my paper back copy had a sort of matte finish that was a bit of a nightmare for my brain. I would recommend using a book cover if it does the same for you

    December 25, 2022
  • Lisa Bernhard

    Of course you’d have to have a story this good to tell to write such an incredible book. The unbelievable adventure is written so beautifully you feel as if you were there. It is still hard to imagine what they went through at that time with so little. I’ll read again one day and maybe again.

    December 25, 2022
  • Liz Larson

    Strong simple prose conveying the visceral truth of a journey full of grit and dare I say… endurance. An awe-inspiring tale of capable leadership and the importance of mindset

    December 25, 2022
  • AOG

    I found it hard to put this book down. What these men went through is absolutely amazing. It is almost unbelievable. It’s a story of grit, courage, and perseverance. It makes me realize that whatever hardships I might have are not so bad.

    December 25, 2022
  • happymanatee

    I’d give this book 100 stars if I could. Such a great read – the flow of the story, how descriptive it is (even for someone with zero boat knowledge), I was enraptured and felt with all of the characters. Absolutely highly recommend!!

    December 25, 2022
  • owen lee

    This was a very entertaining read and a truly inspiring story. It’s almost unbelievable what they endured. I would highly recommend.

    December 25, 2022
  • Kernow

    It’s hard to imagine the tough quality of the early explorers–and I am not talking that far back. Would we be capable of such physical courage and “endurance?” I would not! Some people have traits that are almost superhuman. Today we admire the football player, athlete, or singer. Yesterday it was the kind of men depicted in this journey. I think I resonate more to yesterday. Grateful this was written. Put this in your home library and read it more than once.

    December 25, 2022

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